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Gabriel Born , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 562min
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Sheila Jensen, desperate to invent a genetic cure, defies rules against combining animal and human DNA. She stirs outrage, so her fiancé and boss, Philip Ohl, blames her for the illegal and immoral work, destroying her career. Still, Sheila is motivated; her diagnosis will kill her, so she engineers her last ovum to make a deadly nerve-disorder cure. Risking her life, she bears the child, hoping her transferable DNA cure will work, but she can´t find the cure in Gabriel´s DNA. She loses faith; soon, her strength and health deteriorate. As Gabriel grows, her perception shifts. He is a prodigy who wins her wounded heart. She is shocked when he develops perfect blue wings at age five. All he wants to do is fly. Sheila can´t contain him. When he flies, some of the watcher´s consciousness joins him; his audience feels as if they fly, too. When video goes viral, devotees flock to watch the angel boy, hoping to join the ecstatic ride. Violent protesters arrive, too, spewing vitriol against him. Sheila flees with Gabriel, afraid Philip will claim her son. When he does so with a court order that shuts Sheila out, she fears for Gabriel. She knows the institution will do anything in the name of research. Gabriel has completely opened her heart, healed her, and given her a taste of unimagined freedom. Clearly, the only way to rescue him is to accept his expanded vision and allow him to teach her how to actually fly. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Emily Caldwell. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/135034/bk_acx0_135034_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 26.06.2019
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To the Best of Our Knowledge: Sympathy for the ...
9,95 € *
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In this hour, Jack Abramoff. He’s hardly a murderer. But to many in the Beltline, he’s the devil incarnate. Senator Conrad Burns, said ´´I wish he’d never been born.” Congresswoman Deborah Price said, ´´He is a creep, and we hate him.” Paul Begala summed it up when he said on Crossfire ´´Jack Abramoff, he’s scum.” How did this guy earn such vitriol? Jack Abramoff was the notorious lobbyist at the center of one of Washington’s most far-reaching corruption scandals.He served four years for fraud, tax evasion and conspiracy to bribe public officials. His testimony brought down dozens of other public and elected officials. And he still owes 44 million dollars in restitution. Abramoff is out of jail now, and he told Anne Strainchamps he intends to spend the rest of his life making amends.Next, there’s one devil we NEVER sympathize with: the terrorist. But... Hold on. Not so fast, says filmmaker Marshall Curry. His documentary If a Tree Falls follows Daniel McGowan – a convicted terrorist… currently serving time. McGowan used arson as political protest with The Earth Liberation Front – a group the FBI considers America’s number one domestic terrorist threat.After that, there´s a biblical concept we’ve been talking about – redemption. The dictionary defines it as deliverance from sin. Atonement for guilt. But are there – should there be – limits to the kind of sins that can be redeemed? What about mass murder? And finally, Jim Fleming responds to the documentary film If a Tree Falls that follows Daniel McGowan – a convicted terrorist… currently serving time. McGowan used arson as political protest with The Earth Liberation Front – a group the FBI considers America’s number one domestic terrorist threat. [Broadcast Date: April 5, 2013] 1. Language: English. Narrator: Jim Fleming. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/rt/tbon/130405/rt_tbon_130405_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 26.06.2019
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Into Thin Air
11,99 € *
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National Bestseller A bank of clouds was assembling on the not-so-distant horizon, but journalist-mountaineer Jon Krakauer, standing on the summit of Mt. Everest, saw nothing that ´´suggested that a murderous storm was bearing down.´´ He was wrong. The storm, which claimed five lives and left countless more--including Krakauer´s--in guilt-ridden disarray, would also provide the impetus for Into Thin Air, Krakauer´s epic account of the May 1996 disaster. By writing Into Thin Air, Krakauer may have hoped to exorcise some of his own demons and lay to rest some of the painful questions that still surround the event. He takes great pains to provide a balanced picture of the people and events he witnessed and gives due credit to the tireless and dedicated Sherpas. He also avoids blasting easy targets such as Sandy Pittman, the wealthy socialite who brought an espresso maker along on the expedition. Krakauer´s highly personal inquiry into the catastrophe provides a great deal of insight into what went wrong. But for Krakauer himself, further interviews and investigations only lead him to the conclusion that his perceived failures were directly responsible for a fellow climber´s death. Clearly, Krakauer remains haunted by the disaster, and although he relates a number of incidents in which he acted selflessly and even heroically, he seems unable to view those instances objectively. In the end, despite his evenhanded and even generous assessment of others´ actions, he reserves a full measure of vitriol for himself. This updated trade paperback edition of Into Thin Air includes an extensive new postscript that sheds fascinating light on the acrimonious debate that flared between Krakauer and Everest guide Anatoli Boukreev in the wake of the tragedy. ´´I have no doubt that Boukreev´s intentions were good on summit day,´´ writes Krakauer in the postscript, dated August 1999. ´´What disturbs me, though, was Boukreev´s refusal to acknowledge the possibility that he made even a single poor decision. Never did he indicate that perhaps it wasn´t the best choice to climb without gas or go down ahead of his clients.´´ As usual, Krakauer supports his points with dogged research and a good dose of humility. But rather than continue the heated discourse that has raged since Into Thin Air´s denouncement of guide Boukreev, Krakauer´s tone is conciliatory; he points most of his criticism at G. Weston De Walt, who coauthored The Climb, Boukreev´s version of events. And in a touching conclusion, Krakauer recounts his last conversation with the late Boukreev, in which the two weathered climbers agreed to disagree about certain points. Krakauer had great hopes to patch things up with Boukreev, but the Russian later died in an avalanche on another Himalayan peak, Annapurna I. In 1999, Krakauer received an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters--a prestigious prize intended ´´to honor writers of exceptional accomplishment.´´ According to the Academy´s citation, ´´Krakauer combines the tenacity and courage of the finest tradition of investigative journalism with the stylish subtlety and profound insight of the born writer. His account of an ascent of Mount Everest has led to a general reevaluation of climbing and of the commercialization of what was once a romantic, solitary sport; while his account of the life and death of Christopher McCandless, who died of starvation after challenging the Alaskan wilderness, delves even more deeply and disturbingly into the fascination of nature and the devastating effects of its lure on a young and curious mind.´´

Anbieter: buecher.de
Stand: 16.07.2019
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